UW Planetarium Tuesday Programs Temporarily Move to Saturday | New

May 25, 2022

A climber straddles the Tetons as the corona of the sun briefly lights up the sky and a bright sliver of the sun emerges during the 2017 total solar eclipse. (UW Planetarium Photo)

The Harry C. Vaughan Planetarium at the University of Wyoming normally holds its educational programming on Tuesday evenings. However, these programs are temporarily moving to Saturday night programming for June, and possibly for the summer.

“This coming month will feature a new rotation of live lectures, films and musical performances at the Vaughan Planetarium,” said Max Gilbraith, planetarium coordinator. “We haven’t done some programs since last summer, so check out these exciting seasonal shows. We are temporarily moving our programs from Tuesday to Saturday evenings. »

For tickets or to receive more program information, email [email protected] or leave a voicemail message and a callback phone number at (307) 766-6506. Tickets are $5 for the public and $3 for students, seniors, veterans, first responders, and under 18s. Places are free for children under 5 years old.

Reservations or pre-purchases are not required and walk-ins are welcome. Tickets can be purchased online with a credit card, reserved by email or voicemail, or purchased at the start of the show. Cash or check is accepted at the door. The planetarium, which can accommodate 58 people, is located in the basement of the Physical Sciences Pavilion. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis outside of ADA/wheelchair designated seating.

To pay for tickets with a credit card, go to https://www.uwyo.edu/uwplanetarium/ticket.aspx. For a group larger than six, email the planetarium for a private show at https://uwyo.sjc1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bKuqIynOn7gFK2F. Tickets for private shows are the same as for public programs.

A film and a special live lecture for the public will be presented each week. All programs last approximately one hour. If time permits, part of the show may also focus on a live sky tour or additional information related to the subject of the film.

The June schedule is as follows:

— Friday, June 3, 8 p.m.: “Solar System Vacation”. This program will visit the most exciting and relaxing places in the solar system. Admire giant ice geysers, lava lakes and the Northern Lights; or watch the sun set over methane lakes over the sun’s bizarre moons and planets.

— Saturday, June 4, 2 p.m.: “From the Earth to the Universe”, a full-dome film. This voyage of celestial discovery explores theories from ancient Greek astronomers to today’s largest telescopes.

— Saturday, June 4, 8 p.m.: “Wyoming Skies”. The program features an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season.

— Friday, June 10, 8 p.m.: “Frozen Worlds”. This program explores the poles of the Earth; March; the moons of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune; and the minor planet Pluto.

— Saturday, June 11, 2 p.m.: “The Sun: Our Living Star”, a full-dome film. The sun consumes 600 million tons of hydrogen per second and is 500 times more massive than all the planets combined. Viewers will uncover the secrets of the sun and experience never-before-seen footage of its violent surface in an immersive full-dome format.

— Saturday, June 11, 8 p.m.: “Liquid Sky: Women Who Rock”, a sound and light show based on music. The program will feature music from artists such as Cyndi Lauper, The Cranberries, Florence and the Machine, Mitski, Japanese Breakfast and more. in 5.1 surround sound. The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

— Friday, June 17, 8 p.m.: “Great American Eclipse of 2017”. Relive and celebrate the 2017 eclipse that passed through Wyoming. The program will share images of the full eclipse dome captured from the ground and air and explore the science of eclipses.

— Saturday, June 18, 2 p.m.: “Two Little Pieces of Glass: The Incredible Telescope”, a full-dome film. Learn about the history of the telescope, from the modifications Galileo made to a child’s spyglass – using two small pieces of glass – to the launch of the NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope and the future of astronomy.

— Saturday, June 18, 8 p.m.: “Wyoming Skies”. The program features an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season.

— Friday, June 24, 8 p.m.: “Black Holes”. Are black holes a mistake of nature or portals to the unknown? Physics allows speculation about the nature of these bizarre structures, but astronomers are taking a closer look at these mysterious and fascinating objects.

— Saturday, June 25, 2 p.m.: “The Mystery of Dark Matter: Exploring a Cosmic Secret”, a full-dome film. What holds the galaxies together? What are the building blocks of the universe? What makes the universe look like it does today? About a quarter of the universe is filled with a mysterious glue: dark matter.

— Saturday, June 25, 8 p.m.: “Liquid Sky: Electronica”, a sound and light show based on music. The program will include a personalized playlist of today’s top artists in 5.1 surround sound. The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

For a more detailed description of these programs, go to www.uwyo.edu/physics/planetarium/schedule.html.

Arline J. Mercier