UW Planetarium to spotlight NASA’s Artemis 1 program in August | New

July 27, 2022

Artemis 1 sits on the launch pad in preparation for its mission around the moon in August. (Photo by UW Planetarium)

A look at NASA’s Artemis program and an examination of the five years of the 2017 eclipse will highlight the timing of the Harry C. Vaughan Planetarium at the University of Wyoming in August.

“We are delighted to welcome students to UW and hope that everyone will have the chance to experience our programs,” said Max Gilbraith, planetarium coordinator. “NASA’s Artemis program – to bring humans back to the moon – is set to launch in August, so our opening weekend will look at lunar exploration in our live chat and in the movie. The Great Eclipse America of 2017 will last almost five years to the day, so come and relive the fantastic experience on August 19.

The planetarium’s summer schedule will continue next month with evening programs at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and movies at 2 p.m. on Saturdays.

For tickets or to receive more program information, email [email protected] or leave a voicemail message and a callback phone number at (307) 766-6506. Tickets are $5 for the public and $3 for students, seniors, veterans, first responders, and under 18s. Places are free for children under 5 years old.

Reservations or pre-purchases are not required and walk-ins are welcome. Tickets can be purchased online with a credit card, reserved by email or voicemail, or purchased at the start of the show. Cash or check is accepted at the door. The planetarium, which can accommodate 58 people, is located in the basement of the Physical Sciences Pavilion. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis outside of ADA/wheelchair designated seating.

To pay for tickets with a credit card, go to https://www.uwyo.edu/uwplanetarium/ticket.aspx. For a group larger than six, email the planetarium for a private show at https://uwyo.sjc1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bKuqIynOn7gFK2F. Tickets for private shows are the same as for public programs.

A film and a special live lecture for the public will be presented each week. All programs last approximately one hour. If time allows, part of the show may also focus on a live sky tour or additional information related to the subject of the film.

The schedule for August is as follows:

— Friday, August 5, 8 p.m.: “Apollo at Artemis”. Discover the history of lunar exploration and learn about the latest efforts to bring humanity back to the moon. Artemis 1 prepares for a summer launch from the Orion capsule, uncrewed, on a 25-day journey to the moon and back.

— Saturday, August 6, 2 p.m.: “Return to the Moon for Good”, a full-dome film. This film opens with the first era of space exploration in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Viewers will learn what this era of landers and orbiters taught the world about the moon.

— Saturday, August 6, 8 p.m.: “Liquid Sky: Women Who Rock,” a music-based light show. The program will include a personalized playlist of music from artists such as Cyndi Lauper, The Cranberries, Florence and the Machine, Mitski, Japanese Breakfast and more in 5.1 surround sound. The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

— Friday, August 12, 8 p.m.: “Dust, light, dust”. This program explores the science behind star formation; the various forms they take; and the stellar graveyard, including white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes.

— Saturday, August 13, 2 p.m.: “From the Earth to the Universe”, a full-dome film. This voyage of celestial discovery explores theories from ancient Greek astronomers to today’s largest telescopes.

— Saturday, August 13, 8 p.m.: “Wyoming Skies”. The program features an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season.

— Friday, August 19, 8 p.m.: “Great American Eclipse of 2017”. Relive and celebrate the 2017 eclipse that passed through Wyoming. The program will share images of the full eclipse dome captured from the ground and air and explore the science of eclipses.

— Saturday, August 20, 2 p.m.: “The Sun: Our Living Star”, a full-dome film. The sun consumes 600 million tons of hydrogen per second and is 500 times more massive than all the planets combined. Viewers will uncover the secrets of the sun and experience never-before-seen footage of its violent surface in an immersive full-dome format.

— Saturday, August 20, 8 p.m.: “Liquid Sky: Pop,” a music-based light show. The program will offer a personalized playlist of artists’ music in 5.1 surround sound. The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

— Friday, August 26, 8 p.m.: “Aurorae: Dancing Lights”. The program will discuss what causes the Northern Lights in the sky, where they occur, and whether other planets have auroras.

— Saturday, August 27, 2 p.m.: “Two Little Pieces of Glass: The Incredible Telescope,” a full-dome film. Learn about the history of the telescope, from the modifications Galileo made to a child’s spyglass – using two small pieces of glass – to the launch of the NASA/European Space Agency Hubble Space Telescope and the future of astronomy.

— Saturday, August 27, 8 p.m.: “Wyoming Skies”. The program features an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season.

For a more detailed description of these programs, go to www.uwyo.edu/physics/planetarium/schedule.html.

Arline J. Mercier