UW Planetarium celebrates Earth Day in April | New

March 30, 2022

This photo of the Earth and part of the Moon’s surface was taken by astronaut William Anders on December 24, 1968, during the Apollo 8 mission. The UW Harry C. Vaughan Planetarium will celebrate Earth Day with a program on Friday, April 22 at 7 p.m. (UW Planetarium Photo)

The Harry C. Vaughan Planetarium at the University of Wyoming will celebrate Earth Day next month with a program on Friday, April 22.

“Our annual Earth Day show will celebrate our beautiful planet – with stunning 4K imagery from pole to pole and from mountain top to ocean floor – as we cherish our home world. and the life therein,” says Max Gilbraith, planetarium coordinator.

For tickets or to receive more program information, email [email protected] or leave a voicemail message and a callback phone number at (307) 766-6506. Tickets are $5 for the public and $3 for students, seniors, veterans, first responders, and under 18s. Places are free for children under 5 years old.

Reservations or pre-purchases are not required and walk-ins are welcome. Tickets can be purchased online with a credit card, reserved by email or voicemail, or purchased at the start of the show. Cash or check is accepted at the door. The planetarium, which can accommodate 58 people, is located in the basement of the Physical Sciences Pavilion. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis outside of ADA/wheelchair designated seating.

To pay for tickets with a credit card, go to https://www.uwyo.edu/uwplanetarium/ticket.aspx. For a group larger than six, email the planetarium for a private show at https://uwyo.sjc1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bKuqIynOn7gFK2F. Tickets for private shows are the same as for public programs.

A film and a special live lecture for the public will be presented each week. All programs last approximately one hour. If time permits, part of the show may also focus on a live sky tour or additional information related to the subject of the film.

The April schedule is as follows:

— Friday, April 1, 7 p.m.: “Flat Earth”. This program – specially planned for April Fool’s Day – explores eclipses, telescope images, space exploration, satellites, maritime navigation, the moon, tides, time zones and Antarctica.

— Saturday, April 2, 2 p.m.: “Return to the Moon for Good”, a full-dome film. This film opens with the first era of space exploration in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Viewers will learn what this era of landers and orbiters taught the world about the moon.

— Saturday, April 2, 7 p.m.: “Liquid Sky: Indie,” a music-based light show. The program will feature music from artists such as Tame Impala, STRFKR, MGMT and M83 in 5.1 surround sound. The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

— Tuesday, April 5, 7 p.m.: “Wyoming Skies”. The program features an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season.

— Friday, April 8, 7 p.m.: “Aurorae: Dancing Lights”. The program will discuss what causes the Northern Lights in the sky, where they occur, and whether other planets have auroras.

— Saturday, April 9, 2 p.m.: “Max Goes to the Moon”, a full-dome film. Max, the dog, and a young girl named Tori make the first trip to the moon since the Apollo era.

— Friday, April 15, 7 p.m.: “Search for extra-terrestrial life”. Astronomers use ground and space telescopes to try to locate signs of life on other planets. Landers, rovers and probes visit the scattered planets and moons of our system to hunt aliens.

— Saturday, April 16, 2 p.m.: “Distant Worlds: Alien Life,” a full-dome film. This film explores one of humanity’s most enduring questions: Are we alone?

— Saturday, April 16, 7 p.m.: “Liquid Sky: Pop,” a music-based light show. The program will include a playlist of music from today’s top artists in 5.1 surround sound. The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

— Tuesday, April 19, 7 p.m.: “Wyoming Skies”. The program features an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season.

— Friday, April 22, 7 p.m.: “Earth Day”. This program observes the Earth from the ground, the sky and space. Visitors can learn about glaciers, atmospheric science, meteorology, extreme weather events, anthropogenic changes, and climate history.

— Saturday, April 23, 2 p.m.: “From the Earth to the Universe”, a full-dome film. This voyage of celestial discovery explores theories from ancient Greek astronomers to today’s largest telescopes.

— Friday, April 29, 7 p.m.: “March”. This program will discuss recent discoveries of the Red Planet and its ability to support life.

— Saturday, April 30, 2 p.m.: “Mexica Archaeoastronomy: Between Space and Time”, a full-dome film. This program illustrates the important role played by astronomical observation in the evolution of pre-Hispanic cultures in central Mexico.

— Saturday, April 30, 7 p.m.: “Liquid Sky: Electronica,” a music-based light show. The program will feature music from today’s top artists in 5.1 surround sound. The planetarium sky in 4K resolution will become a canvas of color, pattern and movement with state-of-the-art music visualization software and live VJ talent.

For a more detailed description of these programs, go to www.uwyo.edu/physics/planetarium/schedule.html.

Arline J. Mercier